Job Announcement: LIT Program Manager

Title: Program Manager – Learning Immersive Tech Supervises: LIT Teaching Artists Responsible to: Director of Arts Integration Annual Contract/Stipend: $21,000 20 hours/week @ $22-24/hour (rate commensurate with experience) Temporary, Part-Time, Term limited through August 31, 2019. Arts Corps and Reel Grrls hope to continue this role, pending funding. Deadline to apply: EOD October 29, 2018 […]

Title: Program Manager – Learning Immersive Tech

Supervises: LIT Teaching Artists

Responsible to: Director of Arts Integration

Annual Contract/Stipend: $21,000

20 hours/week @ $22-24/hour (rate commensurate with experience)

Temporary, Part-Time, Term limited through August 31, 2019. Arts Corps and Reel Grrls hope to continue this role, pending funding.

Deadline to apply: EOD October 29, 2018

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

Arts Corps and Reel Grrls Learning Immersive Technology (LIT) program addresses the need for low-income students of color in Seattle and South King County to gain equitable access to STEM fields through arts education. As district and state resources have ebbed due to budgetary cutbacks, arts experiences in the community and in K-12 schools have become increasingly limited or nonexistent. Arts Corps and Reel Grrls offer a viable and unique means of supplementing the current deficit of support for arts, tech, and computational learning through teaching artist-led workshops, as well as professional experiences and performance opportunities to support the skills acquisition of developing artists and technology innovators.

Using Arts Corps’ expertise in curriculum development for arts-based experiential learning, and Reel Grrls expertise in digital media creation, these two organizations are dedicated to developing creative habits of mind in young people and will play a major role in providing students with the skills needed and critical thinking required to successfully be working in 21st century careers. Both Arts Corps and Reel Grrls are committed to racial and gender equity and works to build capacity by recruiting and training students to be the next generation teaching artists, thus ensuring that our teaching teams reflect the identities of students.

 View the full job description here: LIT Program Manager JD

Read More

Upcoming Professional Development Opportunities

Seattle Public Schools Community Partnerships Program is collaborating with Arts Corps on two workshops this year: Creative Approaches to Classroom Behavior, and Increasing Inclusivity and Belonging Through Creativity. These workshops are for teachers, school staff, teaching artists, administrators, or any one else interested in learning more about using the arts as a catalyst for creativity, increased […]

Seattle Public Schools Community Partnerships Program is collaborating with Arts Corps on two workshops this year: Creative Approaches to Classroom Behavior, and Increasing Inclusivity and Belonging Through Creativity. These workshops are for teachers, school staff, teaching artists, administrators, or any one else interested in learning more about using the arts as a catalyst for creativity, increased sense of belonging, classroom management, and engagement.

Check out our workshop descriptions below, and view the full professional development calendar HERE.

 

Creative Approaches to Classroom Behavior

11/29/18 10:00am

Intended audience: Managers or coordinators and frontline youth workers

Location: Rainier Beach Library P1

Every educator has experienced students disrupting class – moving their bodies, talking loudly, interrupting peers and teachers. Often those students are directed to sit down and be quiet, or sent to the office. In this workshop we will explore the science of why young people disrupt class, the ways disruptive behaviors are linked to their environment, and how the arts and creative processes can be a conduit to meet our students’ Maslovian needs and address challenging behaviors in the classroom.

Register for the session HERE.

 

Increasing Inclusivity and Belonging Through Creativity

1/8/19 4:00pm

Facilitated by: Arts Corps

Intended audience: Managers or coordinators, frontline youth workers, classroom teachers, and classroom/school support staff

Location: 2100 Building Art Room P1

Increasing inclusivity and belonging through creativity:

Join us for an exploration of youth development through hands on activities that positively impact students’ sense of belonging and promote inclusivity in a classroom or out-of-school-time program. In this workshop, Arts Corps teaching artists and program staff will lead participants through an exploration of strategies for using creativity to foster positive mindsets across programs, age groups and venues, and the role creative youth development plays in achieving greater justice and equity in education

Register for the session HERE.

 

See the full professional development calendar HERE.

Read More

Arts Corps welcomes new board members!

Happy Fall!!!! I always love the start of the new school year when you see your friends you haven’t seen all summer, show up on the first day with a dope new Girbaud jean set, and get ready to learn and grow over the next nine months. Sometimes there’s new faces to welcome, and sometimes […]

Happy Fall!!!!

I always love the start of the new school year when you see your friends you haven’t seen all summer, show up on the first day with a dope new Girbaud jean set, and get ready to learn and grow over the next nine months. Sometimes there’s new faces to welcome, and sometimes there’s new changes that are super exciting. This year at Arts Corps, we are experiencing both. After serving on our board for three years, Tanisha Brandon-Felder is our new Board President. She’s taking over for the amazing Sara Lawson, whom just finished her nine year board service at Arts Corps. Don’t worry though, because Sara still is, and will always be Arts Corps family.

After going through a highly thorough process, and looking at thousands of documents, we now have three new board members: Janet Galore, elizabeth ortega, and Sharmaine Tillmon. Please welcome the new board family to Arts Corps, and sing their praises. Their bios are below, and I can confirm that when you say hello to them, they will not turn their backs to you and walk away.

18922707_311002669356449_3181512002812072223_oSharmaine Tillmon was a singer songwriter in Seattle, WA. She started getting more hands on in Music business and taking on leadership roles when she joined The Residency back in summer 2016. As a Performer she’s had the opportunity to grace stages at Mopop Skychurch, Totem star shows, Chop Suey, Tesla, and etc. She’s also had the opportunity to curate a couple of stages at Upstream, Chop suey, etc. As a lyricist Sharmaine will continue to write what’s real, authentic and continue to inspire the next generation of leaders.

elizabethelizabeth maria ortega landed herself at Arts Corps in 2011 as a classroom assistant. She worked with a variety of art forms, began teaching her own class and then shifted into her work with FEEST. At FEEST, elizabeth worked for several years alongside young people to critically think about the root causes of health injustices in communities of color and creatively push back in their communities. She has also done work in various arts communities, youth shelters, middle and high schools, with immigrant rights and is now a teacher with a social justice emphasis at Puget Sound Community School. She is a writer, printmaker artist and carries her curiosity and creativity wherever she goes, from shifting power and institutions towards justice to playing with friends on the weekends. She creates and sells her art out of a studio in Fremont with other fellow qpoc artists. She holds a B.A. degree in Sociology from the University of Arizona and a MAEd in Education from Antioch University with a thesis on Decolonizing Learning Processes.

janet-332x442Janet Galore is a life-long Seattleite, artist, and designer who enjoys blending art and technology. She works as a creative director at Amazon, where her team uses research, storytelling, and prototyping to envision future customer experiences. Previously she spent 10 years at Microsoft envisioning the future; she designed games and animated dead fish at startups; and received a B.S. in pure mathematics from the University of Washington. She and her husband own a creative space called The Grocery on North Beacon Hill where they incubate art that takes risks. They seek to connect the community with creative people in the hopes of building an appreciation of artists as culture makers and interrogators, and nurturing a healthier ecology of art in our city.

Read More

Spokes Leadership Application Open!

Calling all Youth POETS, MUSICIANS & ARTISTS! We’re looking for fierce young artists (aged 14-19) who want to create change through community organizing, performance events and artistry! This is a 7-month commitment to being a leader and organizer for the Arts Corps Teen Leadership Program. Internship is from October 24th – May 1st. Leaders will […]

Calling all Youth POETS, MUSICIANS & ARTISTS! We’re looking for fierce young artists (aged 14-19) who want to create change through community organizing, performance events and artistry! This is a 7-month commitment to being a leader and organizer for the Arts Corps Teen Leadership Program. Internship is from October 24th – May 1st. Leaders will meet every Tuesday from 4-6pm at Youngstown in West Seattle.

WHAT YOU’LL GAIN:

$tipend: Leaders will receive a $40.00 monthly stipend!
Build a tight knit, loving community with 20 other youth artists and activists
Professional development and skills (promotion, event planning, public speaking & facilitation)
Artistry development in spoken word and music production
Learn about forms of oppression and how to fight against them using art and community
Good food and 60+ community service hours!

APPLY NOW: http://bit.ly/SPOKES2019

Applications Due: Friday, September 28, 2018

Read More

We’re seeking a Video Animator!

Arts Corps seeks a video animator capable of producing an animated video incorporating information, infographics, animated characters, statistics, and narration to develop at least a 30 sec – 1 minute animated informational video about Arts Corps integrated arts programming. To apply, see the full summary of the opportunity here.

Arts Corps seeks a video animator capable of producing an animated video incorporating information, infographics, animated characters, statistics, and narration to develop at least a 30 sec – 1 minute animated informational video about Arts Corps integrated arts programming.

To apply, see the full summary of the opportunity here.

Read More

The Artist as Prophet by Christa Mazzone Palmberg

When I arrived in Seattle fresh out of graduate school and started interviewing for nonprofit jobs, many people were confused. Why would a person with a Master of Divinity degree- who studied the Bible and theology and Hebrew- be interested in jobs related to social justice? How would my religious training in any way prepare […]

When I arrived in Seattle fresh out of graduate school and started interviewing for nonprofit jobs, many people were confused. Why would a person with a Master of Divinity degree- who studied the Bible and theology and Hebrew- be interested in jobs related to social justice? How would my religious training in any way prepare me for leadership in the nonprofit world? More specific to my interest in working at Arts Corps- what is the relationship between social justice, faith, and the arts?

In some ways, these are fair questions. Many Christians in this country have either completely separated their personal faith from public life, seeing no connection between the two, or their faith has been co-opted by the Religious Right; their identity as Christians has become more influenced by cultural conservatism than by theological beliefs. (For a poignant reflection on this new brand of “Fox Evangelicalism,” read this NYT opinion piece.)

But while I understand how someone might question the relationship between social justice, faith, and the arts, to me it is clear. The role of the artist and the role of the prophet is one and the same- a critic of injustice and a harbinger of hope. In his classic book, The Prophetic Imagination, biblical scholar Walter Brueggemann writes that the tactics of the prophet include both “criticizing” and “energizing”. The prophet is called to publicly critique societal structures that dehumanize while also providing an energizing message that envisions a new reality grounded in love and justice. According to Brueggemann, prophets help us make connections between the world as it is and the world as it should be.

2018_artsol_pinon_073
Arts Corps teaching artist, Kalei

Singer Nina Simone once said, “An artist’s duty, as far as I’m concerned, is to reflect the times.” Art can penetrate our indifference and move us to empathy and action in a way that news articles and lectures simply can’t. Without literature, poetry and painting, how would we cultivate the imagination necessary to envision a better world? Without music and dance, where would we find the strength and joy to keep going when our souls get weary?

James Baldwin took it further and said that the role of the artist is to disturb the peace. This was definitely true of the biblical prophets. Jeremiah, a prophet in the Hebrew Bible, called out false prophets for claiming, “‘Peace, peace’, when there is no peace.” Jeremiah could not stand idly by while the religious leaders of his day condoned the injustices of his people and told them everything would be alright; that there would be no consequences for their behavior.   

Dancers from OTS Arts Manager, Cheryl Delostrinos' class
Dancers from OTS Arts Manager, Cheryl Delostrinos’ class

The prophetic role of the artist has never been so apparent to me as it was on a hot Saturday evening in July at Arts Corps’ community fundraiser, Art & Sol. Much of the art on display provided a fierce critique of some of the issues our nation faces- from our deepening epidemic of gun violence to the continual targeting of young black men by our police. At the same time, the beauty, joy, and hope elicited by the artists was truly inspiring (and brought tears to my eyes).

The program began with a powerful performance by young dancers under the direction of Arts Corps’ OST Arts Manager and co-founder of the AU Collective, Cheryl Delostrinos. The grace, strength, and flexibility of these beautiful young women awed all who were present. Dancing to a contemporary pop song, these young artists inspired audible oohs and aahs with the movement of their bodies.

Next up was Arts Corps alumna and outgoing board member, Carlynn Newhouse, who performed her poem, “The Sky is Falling.” Riffing off the folk character, Chicken Little, Carlynn gave a stinging critique of our nation’s historical and ongoing injustices, as well as a beautiful exhortation not to despair because, “What is the end of something if not the beginning?”

Midway through the program, master veteran teaching artist and Arts Corps’ Director of Creative Youth Development, Eduardo Mendonça, donned his guitar and contagious smile and provided us with a delightful reminder of our shared humanity and the universal language of music. His song, “O Pato”, (“Oh duck” in English), had audience members literally quacking in their seats.

2018_artsol_pinon_065
Director of Creative Youth Development, Eduardo Mendonça

Among the many other powerful works of art that left an impression on me that evening was a painting by Arts Corps teaching artist, Lester Pearson. Imbued with vivid color, the painting depicted two Black women radiating light and happiness. In a culture that too often dehumanizes women of color and portrays them only through caricatures and stereotypes, this piece conveyed their natural beauty and everyday joy; an honest and refreshing reflection of the world as it is.

The evening included too many notable works of art to describe them all in detail here, but I would be remiss not to mention the final performance of the evening by Kalei, an Arts Corps teaching artist who brings Hula Mai ‘Oe to Hazel Valley Elementary students. From the rapid movement of her hips to her gorgeous red attire to the interactive way she invited us into her culture, Kalei’s performance was stunning. It reminded me of the words of the late rabbi and civil rights activist, Abraham Heschel, who said, “Awareness of the Divine begins with wonder.” For Heschel, awe, wonder and radical amazement are the keys to authentic spirituality. All three were elicited in me last Saturday evening. I suspect all three were elicited in everyone who attended Art & Sol.

 

Read More