PRIDE MONTH

It is Pride month and in Seattle, the weekend of celebration has come upon us.  Thousands of people arrived to different parts of Seattle to party, enjoy festivities and be proud.  And while I am a Transgender and Queer Person of Color, proud of who I am and have a desire to celebrate that, I […]

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It is Pride month and in Seattle, the weekend of celebration has come upon us.  Thousands of people arrived to different parts of Seattle to party, enjoy festivities and be proud.  And while I am a Transgender and Queer Person of Color, proud of who I am and have a desire to celebrate that, I am wondering if we could put this congregation of the masses to better use. 

Don’t get me wrong – I do believe that a giant celebration of identities that our current “leadership” is trying to erase and/or keep oppressed is revolutionary and a form of resistance.  It is absolutely necessary for oppressed groups to celebrate in the face of adversity.

I also don’t believe that it is the sole responsibility of LGBTQ people to organize, interrupt and dismantle ICE or any other systems of oppression. 

But I also believe that the world is on fire. 

Our country is on fire. 

And we need to organize together.

And we have to do something.   But what is it that we do?

 

I am reminded of a Martin Niemöller poem: 

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—

Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—

Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—

Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

 

I am a first generation American citizen I keep imagining what who I would be had I been separated from my mother at a young age.  Who I would be or where I would be? Where would my mother be?

My social media feeds, emails and news stories being filled with NO NEW YOUTH JAIL, the children in concentration camps in Texas and youth being targeted by police, I am drawn to ask a question:

Are we ever doing enough to keep young people safe?  What are we doing to preserve this generation?

And while the youth artists I know constantly remind me of what our world could be if they were the leaders, I can’t help but also wonder what world we are leaving them with?

I just wish that we could organize the amount of people that attended Pride weekend at an ICE office and shut it all down.

The question I’d like to propose is for the sake of future generations, how will we rise together for each other?

 

 

Ebo Barton is Arts Corps’ new Teen Leadership Manager, and is a Transgender and Non-Binary, Black and Filipino poet and artist.  They have aspired to be a Youth Speaks Seattle poet since 2007, but have always been too old.  So, instead, they decided to be part of the family, always hoping to support, empower and love the poets and poetry of Youth Speaks Seattle.  They compete in the adult poetry slam circuit; represented Seattle on 5 National Slam Teams and 3 Individual World Poetry Slams.  Their most notable poetry slam accolade is placing 5th in the World in 2016.  Their work touches on political issues from a personal point of view and often is birthed from the struggles of living in the identities that they are. Ebo believes in the power of language and art as a tool for revolution.

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Free Guitar Lessons with Kelli Frances Corrado! * THIS CLASS IS NOW FULL

 This summer Arts Corps is sponsoring teaching artist and songwriter Kelli Frances Corrado to teach free weekly private guitar lessons at Youngstown Cultural Arts Center. The program is from July 9 to August 31, 2018, and is for teens and young adults (age 12 to 21) from the greater Seattle area who come from low income […]

 Kelli Frances CorradoThis summer Arts Corps is sponsoring teaching artist and songwriter Kelli Frances Corrado to teach free weekly private guitar lessons at Youngstown Cultural Arts Center. The program is from July 9 to August 31, 2018, and is for teens and young adults (age 12 to 21) from the greater Seattle area who come from low income households and cannot afford private lessons on their own. Youth who do not own a guitar and will be provided with one they can use and take home. They may also be eligible to keep the guitar if they continue lessons for a year after completing the summer program. This is an opportunity for up to 6 teens to receive high-quality arts instruction to support their artistic and creative development. 

THIS CLASS IS NOW FULL FOR SUMMER 2018

Direct any questions about the program to kfcmusiclessons@gmail.com

Kelli Frances Corrado has been teaching for over 10 years, specializing in helping the beginner start. Growing up in Chicago, she would sneak out during school nights to see hip hop shows and spend weekends with her Czech grandmother learning prayer rituals. This set a unique musical foundation giving voice to her spiritual beliefs and leading her to study guitar, piano, voice and beat making. She received her first grant from The Grammy’s who sponsored her first tour and has had her music featured with NPR’s Radio One, KEXP, BBC6 radio, Tom Tom Magazine, The Girls Are…, The Stranger and Seattle Weekly.

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Youth of Seattle – Apply to be on Arts Corps’ Board of Directors!

Do you have incredible leadership skills, a passion for the arts, and a vision for your community’s future? Apply to be on the Arts Corps Board of Directors! Arts Corps is a non-profit arts organization that revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative power of young people through culturally engaging learning experiences and providing free […]

Do you have incredible leadership skills, a passion for the arts, and a vision for your community’s future?

Apply to be on the Arts Corps Board of Directors!

13439101_10208351659527754_8201209752416047686_nArts Corps is a non-profit arts organization that revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative power of young people through culturally engaging learning experiences and providing free programming for K-12 students in King County. We have an incredible opportunity for 3 young leaders to join our Board of Directors.

The Arts Corps Board directs all the youth programming we offer, builds our vision for social justice and social change, and ensures that the entire organization listens to the communities and youth we serve. The board’s responsibilities range from revolutionary strategy to the nuts-and-bolts of running an organization (budgeting and management).

As a member of the Board, you will have the chance to connect with local artists and activists, gain visibility in the community, and help shape this beloved organization. You will speak for yourself and your peers, and ensure that all the work we do is directed to liberating and invigorating the young leaders of today. You will have mentorship opportunities from fellow board members to grow your leadership skills, and to mentor other young folks in organizing. In addition, you will collect powerful experience for your education, work, and life.
We need you to keep us honest,

visionary,

& make sure all we do is dope as shit.

What is involved?

  • We meet monthly on the 4th Monday of each month from 5-7pm at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center (we can provide bus passes)
  • BOMB snacks at every meeting!
  • A 1-year commitment (can be extended), beginning July 2018 through June 2019

You must be 18 years old or turning 18 this summer(ish)

DEADLINE: May 31st
Please fill out the application page, (add more if you need) and return:

Download the application here

  • email to (zweiglec@seattleu.edu) (plz put ‘Arts Corps Board Application’ in the subject)
  • mail/drop off paper applications to: Arts Corps 4408 Delridge Way SW, Suite 110 98106.

OR apply online here!

Questions? Ask Chris Zweigle (he/him): zweiglec@seattleu.edu

 

 

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The Notorious Give B.I.G.

On May 9th, Seattle Foundation hosts Give Big, the largest day for online giving in King County. This is also, reportedly, the final year of Give Big. This, coupled with the fact that Arts Corps is a socially just organization that wants to highlight collective impact happening in our community, we are going to do something […]

On May 9th, Seattle Foundation hosts Give Big, the largest day for online giving in King County. This is also, reportedly, the final year of Give Big. This, coupled with the fact that Arts Corps is a socially just organization that wants to highlight collective impact happening in our community, we are going to do something different this year.

Instead of promoting Arts Corps, we want to promote organizations that are:

  1. Mission aligned
  2. Partner with Arts Corps
  3. Don’t have a full time development staff that does most of the work for Give Big

Sooo, please RISE to the occasion, and show these organizations some love on May 9th!

Reel Grrls empowers young women & gender non-conforming youth to explore, critique, and author media through a feminist lens.

Totem Star amplifies and empowers youth voice through music production and performance to strengthen life skills in leadership, civic engagement, and community building.  

the Service Board (tSB) mentors youth to conquer personal and cultural challenges through outdoor adventure, environmental and social justice education, and public service. 

The Vera Project fuels personal and community transformation through collaborative, youth-driven engagement in music and art.gb-logo-post

 

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For the Culture

Beyoncé Beyoncé  Beyoncé Let me rewind.  Zumbi, a Western African descendant related to the Kingo aristocracy was born free in Brazil in 1655 and killed on November 20, 1695. Zumbi was assassinated because he fought against slavery and colonialism. Marielle Franco was born in July 1979 in a slum in Rio de Janeiro. Mariella Franco, […]

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Beyoncé

Beyoncé 

Beyoncé

Let me rewind. 

Zumbi, a Western African descendant related to the Kingo aristocracy was born free in Brazil in 1655 and killed on November 20, 1695. Zumbi was assassinated because he fought against slavery and colonialism.

Marielle Franco was born in July 1979 in a slum in Rio de Janeiro. Mariella Franco, was a grassroots organizer, human rights activist, and a Black lesbian feminist.  An activist since she was 9 years old, she was a genuine representative of women, LGBT people, and poor and black people from the favelas. She gave birth to her only child when she was only 19 years old, and as a single mother she managed to earn a master’s degree in public administration. She became one of the most voted Rio de Janeiro City Council Members in the 2016 elections with over 46,500 votes, making her one of the 51 officials elected out of more than 1,500 candidates. 

marielle-franco-1024x640After giving a speech empowering Black women on March 14th, 2018, Marielle Franco was murdered. She was assassinated because her strong voice was a vigorous instrument in favor of human rights.

From Zumbi to Mariella, from the 17th to the 21st Century, the history hasn’t changed. Zumbi and Mariela are names that stand out because their status and leadership honor all of us who stand against injustice. However, we need to admit that activists are still being killed, as I type this article and as you read these lines. Voices that are not amplified by the media right now reporting cruelty.  

Three hundred years after Zumbi, we are still fighting against “modern slavery” and we are still fighting for human rights. Statistics show that young black Brazilians are 70 percent of the population, that are murdered every year. Every 23 minutes, a black child is a victim of homicide according to a Brazilian Senate report in 2017. 

The results aren’t much better in the USA, where the CDC reports that black children are 10 times more likely to victims of homicide, compared to their white counterparts.

We have fought against injustices for centuries, yet we are still fighting today.

However, knowing that the history repeats itself every single day for centuries and centuries, I am not hopeless. I can’t be. I see powerful voices multiplying and young people are no longer afraid to talk. I might not be around when change authentically happens, but I know that our consistency on stopping oppression and supporting youth leadership means that we are moving towards to building new leaders who will change the course of history.

One of those leaders is Beyoncé.

You read her name and you instantly feel better.

This past weekend Beyoncé headlined Coachella, and in doing so, was the first black woman to ever headline Coachella. Her two-hour performance featured a marching band straight out of black colleges, her husband Jay-Z, her sister Solange, a Destiny’s Child reunion, a beautiful rendition of the Negro National Anthem, and was “drippin” in Black Excellence. She was able to bring the joy that has been missing from life back to us. Her outfits reflected both the culture of the Black South and the culture of the people of the African diaspora. My daughters and I spent our Sunday morning watching and dancing to the greatest living performer…and it was exactly what we needed.

From the murder of Marielle in Brazil, to the murder of Stephon Clark, the arrest of two black men in Starbucks, the refusal to charge the officers that killed Alton Sterling, to the chemical attacks in Syria, and the US response to it, it has difficult to wake up every day and read the news. My Instagram and Twitter feeds have been of tears, of anger, and full of sadness.

That all changed with Beyoncé.

She reminded us of our humanity, of our beauty. When I write ‘us,’ I don’t just mean black peoples (although definitely black people), I mean civilization. The love on the stage was overwhelming. She, as always, has captured the zeitgeist of the times, and was able to turn it into love. I feel rejuvenated. I feel powerful. I feel human. I feel empowered.

Her art showed us that we are not forgotten. Her art showed us that we will be ok. Her art showed the world that nothing can stop a revolution. We need to join her in creating art for the people, by the people, about the people, and with the people. She showed us that we can only do it, together, as a family. She showed us, we are ALL Destiny’s Children.

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We’re hiring a Teen Leadership Manager!

Title: Teen Leadership Manager at Arts Corps Responsible to: Director of Creative Youth Development Supervises: 1 AmeriCorps Member, Bookings Coordinator and Spokes Pathway Lead Position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by April 30th, 2018. Why Work at Arts Corps? Arts Corps revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative […]

Title: Teen Leadership Manager at Arts Corps

Responsible to: Director of Creative Youth Development

Supervises: 1 AmeriCorps Member, Bookings Coordinator and Spokes Pathway Lead

Position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by April 30th, 2018.

Why Work at Arts Corps?

Arts Corps revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative power of young people through culturally engaging learning experiences. We work toward a world where barriers to arts education no longer exist and all young people can creatively lead the transformation of schools, neighborhoods, and beyond.

Arts Corps is committed to the personal and professional growth of its employees. We work hard to build a supportive, respectful and celebratory community among our staff, board and volunteers. We look forward to finding the next member of our extended Arts Corps family.

The Teen Leadership Program makes space for the next generation of young artists to hone their capacities for activism and cultural work. Teen leaders cultivate strong creative habits, community organizing skills, professional development, and social justice analysis.

Job Summary:

This position will have primary responsibility for managing Arts Corps’ Teen Leadership programs, including Youth Speaks Seattle, Spokes, Arts Liberation and Leadership Institute (ALLI) and program partnerships.

 

To learn more about the responsibilities and qualifications and to apply, see the full job description here.

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