Youth of Seattle – Apply to be on Arts Corps’ Board of Directors!

Do you have incredible leadership skills, a passion for the arts, and a vision for your community’s future? Apply to be on the Arts Corps Board of Directors! Arts Corps is a non-profit arts organization that revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative power of young people through culturally engaging learning experiences and providing free […]

Do you have incredible leadership skills, a passion for the arts, and a vision for your community’s future?

Apply to be on the Arts Corps Board of Directors!

13439101_10208351659527754_8201209752416047686_nArts Corps is a non-profit arts organization that revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative power of young people through culturally engaging learning experiences and providing free programming for K-12 students in King County. We have an incredible opportunity for 3 young leaders to join our Board of Directors.

The Arts Corps Board directs all the youth programming we offer, builds our vision for social justice and social change, and ensures that the entire organization listens to the communities and youth we serve. The board’s responsibilities range from revolutionary strategy to the nuts-and-bolts of running an organization (budgeting and management).

As a member of the Board, you will have the chance to connect with local artists and activists, gain visibility in the community, and help shape this beloved organization. You will speak for yourself and your peers, and ensure that all the work we do is directed to liberating and invigorating the young leaders of today. You will have mentorship opportunities from fellow board members to grow your leadership skills, and to mentor other young folks in organizing. In addition, you will collect powerful experience for your education, work, and life.
We need you to keep us honest,

visionary,

& make sure all we do is dope as shit.

What is involved?

  • We meet monthly on the 4th Monday of each month from 5-7pm at the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center (we can provide bus passes)
  • BOMB snacks at every meeting!
  • A 1-year commitment (can be extended), beginning July 2018 through June 2019

You must be 18 years old or turning 18 this summer(ish)

DEADLINE: May 31st
Please fill out the application page, (add more if you need) and return:

Download the application here

  • email to (zweiglec@seattleu.edu) (plz put ‘Arts Corps Board Application’ in the subject)
  • mail/drop off paper applications to: Arts Corps 4408 Delridge Way SW, Suite 110 98106.

OR apply online here!

Questions? Ask Chris Zweigle (he/him): zweiglec@seattleu.edu

 

 

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The Notorious Give B.I.G.

On May 9th, Seattle Foundation hosts Give Big, the largest day for online giving in King County. This is also, reportedly, the final year of Give Big. This, coupled with the fact that Arts Corps is a socially just organization that wants to highlight collective impact happening in our community, we are going to do something […]

On May 9th, Seattle Foundation hosts Give Big, the largest day for online giving in King County. This is also, reportedly, the final year of Give Big. This, coupled with the fact that Arts Corps is a socially just organization that wants to highlight collective impact happening in our community, we are going to do something different this year.

Instead of promoting Arts Corps, we want to promote organizations that are:

  1. Mission aligned
  2. Partner with Arts Corps
  3. Don’t have a full time development staff that does most of the work for Give Big

Sooo, please RISE to the occasion, and show these organizations some love on May 9th!

Reel Grrls empowers young women & gender non-conforming youth to explore, critique, and author media through a feminist lens.

Totem Star amplifies and empowers youth voice through music production and performance to strengthen life skills in leadership, civic engagement, and community building.  

the Service Board (tSB) mentors youth to conquer personal and cultural challenges through outdoor adventure, environmental and social justice education, and public service. 

The Vera Project fuels personal and community transformation through collaborative, youth-driven engagement in music and art.gb-logo-post

 

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For the Culture

Beyoncé Beyoncé  Beyoncé Let me rewind.  Zumbi, a Western African descendant related to the Kingo aristocracy was born free in Brazil in 1655 and killed on November 20, 1695. Zumbi was assassinated because he fought against slavery and colonialism. Marielle Franco was born in July 1979 in a slum in Rio de Janeiro. Mariella Franco, […]

beyonce-coachella-2018

Beyoncé

Beyoncé 

Beyoncé

Let me rewind. 

Zumbi, a Western African descendant related to the Kingo aristocracy was born free in Brazil in 1655 and killed on November 20, 1695. Zumbi was assassinated because he fought against slavery and colonialism.

Marielle Franco was born in July 1979 in a slum in Rio de Janeiro. Mariella Franco, was a grassroots organizer, human rights activist, and a Black lesbian feminist.  An activist since she was 9 years old, she was a genuine representative of women, LGBT people, and poor and black people from the favelas. She gave birth to her only child when she was only 19 years old, and as a single mother she managed to earn a master’s degree in public administration. She became one of the most voted Rio de Janeiro City Council Members in the 2016 elections with over 46,500 votes, making her one of the 51 officials elected out of more than 1,500 candidates. 

marielle-franco-1024x640After giving a speech empowering Black women on March 14th, 2018, Marielle Franco was murdered. She was assassinated because her strong voice was a vigorous instrument in favor of human rights.

From Zumbi to Mariella, from the 17th to the 21st Century, the history hasn’t changed. Zumbi and Mariela are names that stand out because their status and leadership honor all of us who stand against injustice. However, we need to admit that activists are still being killed, as I type this article and as you read these lines. Voices that are not amplified by the media right now reporting cruelty.  

Three hundred years after Zumbi, we are still fighting against “modern slavery” and we are still fighting for human rights. Statistics show that young black Brazilians are 70 percent of the population, that are murdered every year. Every 23 minutes, a black child is a victim of homicide according to a Brazilian Senate report in 2017. 

The results aren’t much better in the USA, where the CDC reports that black children are 10 times more likely to victims of homicide, compared to their white counterparts.

We have fought against injustices for centuries, yet we are still fighting today.

However, knowing that the history repeats itself every single day for centuries and centuries, I am not hopeless. I can’t be. I see powerful voices multiplying and young people are no longer afraid to talk. I might not be around when change authentically happens, but I know that our consistency on stopping oppression and supporting youth leadership means that we are moving towards to building new leaders who will change the course of history.

One of those leaders is Beyoncé.

You read her name and you instantly feel better.

This past weekend Beyoncé headlined Coachella, and in doing so, was the first black woman to ever headline Coachella. Her two-hour performance featured a marching band straight out of black colleges, her husband Jay-Z, her sister Solange, a Destiny’s Child reunion, a beautiful rendition of the Negro National Anthem, and was “drippin” in Black Excellence. She was able to bring the joy that has been missing from life back to us. Her outfits reflected both the culture of the Black South and the culture of the people of the African diaspora. My daughters and I spent our Sunday morning watching and dancing to the greatest living performer…and it was exactly what we needed.

From the murder of Marielle in Brazil, to the murder of Stephon Clark, the arrest of two black men in Starbucks, the refusal to charge the officers that killed Alton Sterling, to the chemical attacks in Syria, and the US response to it, it has difficult to wake up every day and read the news. My Instagram and Twitter feeds have been of tears, of anger, and full of sadness.

That all changed with Beyoncé.

She reminded us of our humanity, of our beauty. When I write ‘us,’ I don’t just mean black peoples (although definitely black people), I mean civilization. The love on the stage was overwhelming. She, as always, has captured the zeitgeist of the times, and was able to turn it into love. I feel rejuvenated. I feel powerful. I feel human. I feel empowered.

Her art showed us that we are not forgotten. Her art showed us that we will be ok. Her art showed the world that nothing can stop a revolution. We need to join her in creating art for the people, by the people, about the people, and with the people. She showed us that we can only do it, together, as a family. She showed us, we are ALL Destiny’s Children.

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We’re hiring a Teen Leadership Manager!

Title: Teen Leadership Manager at Arts Corps Responsible to: Director of Creative Youth Development Supervises: 1 AmeriCorps Member, Bookings Coordinator and Spokes Pathway Lead Position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by April 30th, 2018. Why Work at Arts Corps? Arts Corps revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative […]

Title: Teen Leadership Manager at Arts Corps

Responsible to: Director of Creative Youth Development

Supervises: 1 AmeriCorps Member, Bookings Coordinator and Spokes Pathway Lead

Position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by April 30th, 2018.

Why Work at Arts Corps?

Arts Corps revolutionizes arts education by igniting the creative power of young people through culturally engaging learning experiences. We work toward a world where barriers to arts education no longer exist and all young people can creatively lead the transformation of schools, neighborhoods, and beyond.

Arts Corps is committed to the personal and professional growth of its employees. We work hard to build a supportive, respectful and celebratory community among our staff, board and volunteers. We look forward to finding the next member of our extended Arts Corps family.

The Teen Leadership Program makes space for the next generation of young artists to hone their capacities for activism and cultural work. Teen leaders cultivate strong creative habits, community organizing skills, professional development, and social justice analysis.

Job Summary:

This position will have primary responsibility for managing Arts Corps’ Teen Leadership programs, including Youth Speaks Seattle, Spokes, Arts Liberation and Leadership Institute (ALLI) and program partnerships.

 

To learn more about the responsibilities and qualifications and to apply, see the full job description here.

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We’re hiring a Teaching Artist for The Residency!

The  Residency Teaching Artist Responsible to: Arts Corps and MoPOP Program Managers Dates/Hours: Summer Residency: July 23rd- August 17, 2018 (90 hours instruction, 45 hours prep); Fall Cypher: Dates TBD (3 hours instruction, 1.5 hours prep); Youth interviews: Mid June (17 hours at prep rate); additional planning times to be determined Compensation: $60/hour for instruction; […]

The  Residency Teaching Artist

Responsible to: Arts Corps and MoPOP Program Managers

Dates/Hours: Summer Residency: July 23rd- August 17, 2018 (90 hours instruction, 45 hours prep);

Fall Cypher: Dates TBD (3 hours instruction, 1.5 hours prep); Youth interviews: Mid June (17 hours at prep rate); additional planning times to be determined

Compensation: $60/hour for instruction; $30/hour for prep

Program Description

Arts Corps, MoPOP, and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis are collaborating to host year 4 of The Residency. The Residency breaks down the barriers of access to equitable arts experiences for underserved teens in the Seattle region in order to build their skills in collaboration, self-expression, technical acumen, leadership identity, and confidence as cultural change-makers. The intensive residency will serve 45 emerging artists through two tracks over four weeks.  Each track will be lead by two teaching artists and a classroom assistant, serving 45 youth.  The Vocal Track will  foster self-expression through lyricism, rhyme structure, and delivery, and the Production Track will emphasize media literacy, beat-making, and song construction. Following the residency, youth will participate in four monthly 3-hour cyphers (from Septemenber through December) as a way to advance their collaborative learning, workshop ideas with their cohort artists, and sustain the sense of shared community and motivation after the completion of the four-week residency.

To learn more and to apply, see the full job description here.

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#WakandaForever

  This past Friday, on February 16th, my family and I went to Black Panther. The minute the movie started, and Black faces filled the screen, I started crying. The heroes were black, the villains were black. The people were black. Even though Wakanda is a fictional place in Africa, featuring fictional characters, it was […]

 
james-wakandaforeverThis past Friday, on February 16th, my family and I went to Black Panther. The minute the movie started, and Black faces filled the screen, I started crying. The heroes were black, the villains were black. The people were black. Even though Wakanda is a fictional place in Africa, featuring fictional characters, it was the first time I saw a movie, where the black people responded to each other, and not to a white narrative. While the movie highlighted issues relevant to communities of color, especially black communities, the movie was also action packed, well written, and well acted.

What was most powerful for me was how the movie celebrated black women and their power. They are the Kingsguard. Unlike Wonder Woman, these women existed among men, yet did not rely on the male gaze to justify their existence. The general of the army was the best soldier in the army. She had no super powers, she was a better warrior than the king, and she was funny! She, and the other women in the movie, looked like my family. My mother, grandmothers, cousins, aunts. My daughters. I’ve never seen that many black women on film, representing so many varied experiences. It was amazing.

Copyright Marvel
Copyright Marvel

The comic book premiered in 1961, and is not connected to the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, yet the movie made me think of the Oakland based social justice organization. Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, in 1966, to prevent police brutality as well as establish a new social, political, and economic order, to improve the Black community. February 17th would have been Huey P. Newton’s 76th birthday.

Coincidentally, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Seattle chapter of the Black Panther Party. The Seattle branch of the Black Panther Party was the first chapter formed outside of the state of California. This chapter helped raise the level of consciousness and resistance in Seattle.

We, at Arts Corps, work toward a world where barriers to arts education no longer exist and all young people can creatively lead the transformation of schools, neighborhoods, and beyond. Please help us work toward this world, and join us at La Festa del Arte on March 16th, at Fremont studios.

Buy your tickets today!

 

James Miles

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