Hunting for My Future: voices of youth at Spruce Street

The youth in Meredith Arena’s poetry class at Spruce Street produced a plethora of poetry last school year. Their collective words have been assembled into a book, which you can download and read below. Arts Corps has a long-standing partnership with Spruce Street Inn, which provides safe residential services for youth who are in crisis. […]

The youth in Meredith Arena’s poetry class at Spruce Street produced a plethora of poetry last school year. Their collective words have been assembled into a book, which you can download and read below.

Arts Corps has a long-standing partnership with Spruce Street Inn, which provides safe residential services for youth who are in crisis. This class was taught by Meredith Arena and supported by Ludin Mejia.

Here is a sampling of the voices in the book:

Yeah he’s black, but he’s my EQUAL
Yeah he’s Mexican, but we’re the SAME
Yeah he’s Asian, but we’re one TOGETHER
WE ARE EQUAL
-Rich

Personal Growth

With no one to aspire to
and no one to lean on,
I created my own path,
free of hatred and con.
A stretched out journey
with no simple short cuts.
I soon realized every experience is an opportunity for learning.

-Arcadia

 

Read the entire book:

Spruce Street Poetry Book 2016-2017

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Tina LaPadula Fellowship now open!

The Tina LaPadula Fellowship provides $2,000 to practicing Arts Corps Teaching Artists to support their teaching artist practice or creative work. This Fellowship was created to honor Tina for 15 years of work with Arts Corps as a teaching artist, and administratively as Faculty Director, Program Director, and Education Director. Tina is still working as […]

The Tina LaPadula Fellowship provides $2,000 to practicing Arts Corps Teaching Artists to support their teaching artist practice or creative work.

This Fellowship was created to honor Tina for 15 years of work with Arts Corps as a teaching artist, and administratively as Faculty Director, Program Director, and Education Director.

Tina is still working as an incredible artist, teaching artist, and arts education advocate in our community.

Click Tina’s Picture to go to the application!

Tina LaPadula, Arts Corps Education Director and Founding Member

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our inaugural Fellowship was awarded to Angel Alviar-Langley, who used the funds to fuel the second annual What’s Poppin Ladiez?! – a celebration of female poppers and women in hip hop. To see her project, check out the What’s Poppin Ladiez?! community.

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The Residency Showcase

  We invite you to join us for The Residency final performance, presented in partnership with Arts Corps, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, and MoPOP. Hosted in MoPOP’s Sky Church, The Residency artists will take the stage to perform their original work produced during the three-week summer program. ABOUT THE RESIDENCY The Residency (formerly Hip-Hop Artist […]

 

We invite you to join us for The Residency final performance, presented in partnership with Arts Corps, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, and MoPOP.

Hosted in MoPOP’s Sky Church, The Residency artists will take the stage to perform their original work produced during the three-week summer program.

ABOUT THE RESIDENCY
The Residency (formerly Hip-Hop Artist Residency) is a collaboration between Arts Corps, MoPOP (formerly EMP Museum), and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis that debuted in the summer of 2015. The program engages up to 40 emerging youth hip-hop artists through two tracks: the Vocal Track, which fosters self-expression through lyricism, delivery, and rhyme structure, and the Production Track, which emphasizes media literacy, beat-making, and song construction. Participants from both tracks collaborate to produce original songs and feature their work at a culminating showcase at the end of the residency.

DATE AND TIME
August 18, 2017
6:30pm–8:00pm

VENUE
Sky Church
MoPOP
325 5th Avenue N
Seattle, WA 98109

TICKET INFO
Free to the public + museum guests

 

hhar_showcase_2017_flier_final

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We’re hiring!

Title: Grants Manager at Arts Corps Responsible to: Development Director Hours: 20 hrs/week Position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by Sept. 5th, 2017 Why Work at Arts Corps? Founded in 2000, Arts Corps’ mission is to unlock the creative power of youth through arts education and community collaboration. […]

Title: Grants Manager at Arts Corps

Responsible to: Development Director

Hours: 20 hrs/week

Position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by Sept. 5th, 2017

Why Work at Arts Corps?

Founded in 2000, Arts Corps’ mission is to unlock the creative power of youth through arts education and community collaboration. Arts Corps is a multidisciplinary organization in Seattle that provides free arts learning opportunities to young people from kindergarten through high school. Our programs encompass school-based programs, out-of-school classes and teen leadership programs. Through these programs and local and national leadership, Arts Corps addresses a critical opportunity gap in a region where race is the greatest determining factor in access to arts education.

Arts Corps classes are proven to build imagination, critical thinking, persistence and other 21st Century skills that help young people reach their full potential in school and in life. In 2012, Arts Corps received the highest national award in community arts education, the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award from the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

Arts Corps has grown significantly over the past several years, and our new Grants Manager will have the opportunity to make a profound impact on young people and on the trajectory of this dynamic organization.

Arts Corps is committed to the personal and professional growth of its employees. We work hard to build a supportive, respectful and celebratory community among our staff, board and volunteers, and we have a remarkable retention rate of staff. We look forward to finding the next member of our extended Arts Corps family.

Job Description

Arts Corps is looking for a part-time Grants Manager who will be responsible for researching and identifying public, foundation and corporate grant prospects; compiling project information from relevant staff members; writing and submitting grants, along with detailed budgets; completing forms and supplemental information; submitting grant reports, and cultivating and stewarding relationships with institutional funders. In this position, you will also create a grants procurement plan, with seasonal goals and milestones. A major part of your performance will be evaluated based on your ability to successfully secure grant awards, with support from Arts Corps staff. This role will be supervised by Arts Corps’ Development Director.

Key Responsibilities

  • Research potential funding sources
  • Draft a grants solicitation schedule
  • Coordinate with key staff to compile relevant project information and compile all necessary grant materials
  • Write/submit grants along with detailed budgets, complete forms and supplemental information to a variety of sources, including public and private funders
  • Satisfy all grant reporting requirements in a timely manner
  • Cultivate and steward strong relationships with institutional funders
  • Work with Development Director and Executive Director, as appropriate, to engage board in cultivation of current and prospective grant makers

 Minimum Qualifications

  • 2+ years experience successfully writing and securing grants
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Exceptionally strong attention to detail
  • Strong time and project management skills
  • Technical savvy with databases (Salesforce preferred), Word and Excel
  • Extensive knowledge of the nonprofit/funding landscape
  • Ability to make sound decisions in a manner consistent with the essential job functions
  • Understanding of communications tools and tactics, including print and social media
  • Excellent people and collaboration skills, strong team player
  • Interest in working in a diverse work environment committed to social justice practices

Compensation will range from $19 to $23 per hour depending on experience. Generous benefits package includes medical, dental and vision insurance, 13 paid holidays and 20 days of paid time off annually.

Please forward all inquiries with a resume, cover letter, and writing sample to dev@artscorps.org or mail a hard copy to Arts Corps, 4408 Delridge Way, SW, Suite 110, Seattle, WA 98106. Please reference the Grant Writer position in the subject line.

 

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There is power in art.

I wake up and it is quiet There’s no noise The sunlight is peeking through the blinds of my bedroom window, where I see the wind ruffle the leaves of our magnolia tree. I hear the wind, now, too. Two hummingbirds are buzzing at the feeder suction cupped to my window. They rest and drink […]

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I wake up and it is quiet

There’s no noise

The sunlight is peeking through the blinds of my bedroom window, where I see the wind ruffle the leaves of our magnolia tree.

I hear the wind, now, too.

Two hummingbirds are buzzing at the feeder suction cupped to my window. They rest and drink the sugary water and look at me through the window. 

A crow caws as it flies past, and my wife rolls over in her sleep. The sound of her breathing is long and measured. 

I wake up like this, everyday. It is extremely peaceful and the most relaxing thing I’ve ever experienced.

Yet, my heart is beating fast, very fast, like wings of the hummingbird outside of my window. There’s a knot of anxiety that refuses to dissipate. Something has a hold on my chest and my breathing is shallow. Why? What is making me feel this way, when I wake up in such an idyllic environment?

I pick up my phone that is next to me on my nightstand, and then I know why. Why I’ve felt this way for months, why I’ve felt uneasy since I moved from Brooklyn to Seattle. 

I feel unsafe. I feel that my life is threatened. 

Scratch that.

I know that my life is threatened.

People are being murdered by the police, almost on a daily basis. The rights of gay and transgendered people are being stripped away from them. Muslims are being targeted by bigots and denied entry into the “land of the free.” The education system is in shambles and young people are being terrorized by current policy. Teachers are devalued and deemed worthless; there are articles about teachers being replaced by AI. Artistic expression and creativity is shunned, but lies are universally accepted. The gap between the rich and poor is widening, as is the divide between black and white. Canada was on fire, and the smokescreen has made Seattle’s air quality akin to Beijing. White Supremacists are marching in Virginia, burning torches, and spreading vitriol, bolstered by a nation that has chosen hate as its form of expression. 

Polar ice caps are melting and it is way too hot. Animals and trees are dying, and I’m laying in bed, and it is quiet and serene. 

It’s feels like I’m lying in a coffin.

I know that I’m lucky, but I know my luck will end. Our luck will end. I wake up every day thinking today will be the day. The day that my life will be taken from me.

Then I remember

We are stronger together.

Out of darkness, there is light.

There is power in art.

After the dark ages in Europe, there was the renaissance. Because of da Vinci, we understood flight. 

After years of “let them eat cake,” we had the French Revolution and with it, folk tales from the Brothers Grimm and music from Mozart and Beethoven. Artists turning their fears and desires  into children’s stories and complex musical notes.

After the Mexican Revolution, we saw the innovative period of Mexican Muralism, which brought us artists like Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. Out of bloodshed and war, these muralists created images of family life and, of working class people, normally overlooked, in classical art.

During the Great Depression, there was also the Harlem Renaissance, highlighting Black artists of the 20’s. From a time when people were grabbing pigeons out of the sky for dinner, Black artists were holding onto life, by reflecting what they saw in the world. There’d be no jazz, rock n roll, or hip hop without the Harlem Renaissance.

I wonder what art will spring forward based on the lives we live in 2017. How will the youth of tomorrow see the youth of today?

 

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What I Do and Don’t Like about Proposition 1

Every day I witness the impact arts exercises in young people lives. A few weeks ago, in a restaurant with my family, a waitress who was serving different section of the room, walked towards my direction. She told me that she was one of my students years ago from an Arts Corps class I taught […]

Every day I witness the impact arts exercises in young people lives. A few weeks ago, in a restaurant with my family, a waitress who was serving different section of the room, walked towards my direction. She told me that she was one of my students years ago from an Arts Corps class I taught at an elementary school in Tukwila. She asked me to keep doing what I do because it changed her life. It’s been over a decade and her experience was still fresh in her mind. Arts Corps now reaches over 2,500 K-12 students in low-income communities, with a majority youth of color. Can you imagine how many young people are impacted every time a teaching artist enters their life?

Eduardo Mendonça's Brazilian Rhythms class at Tukwila Elementary School, 2007
Eduardo Mendonça’s Brazilian Rhythms class at Tukwila Elementary School, 2007

I pleasantly served two terms at 4 Culture Advisory Committee, so I could better understand the bigger picture of King County Arts Organizations. During that time, conversations about arts coalition to bring arts funding to a different level just started.

Undoubtedly, Prop. 1 will support small arts organizations, which is why I will vote for this measure. However, I don’t feel good about larger organizations being allocated 70% after 1.25 percent to create an agency to oversee the funds. This is still unfair, to keep dedicating the small portion to small organizations, which will proportionally continue to struggle in capacity building, maintaining the quality of programs, and to even be able to decently pay our teaching artists, like other professionals, whom are financially appreciated for what they do.  In addition, I am not a fan of regressive tax either, however, I completely trust and appreciate what 4 Culture has done for our arts community for all of these years. Although federal funds for arts is recently at the edge of a cliff, I am proud to witness that our community is bringing new possibilities to support arts.

I hope Prop. 1 can pass, and I want to make sure small organizations, which will bite only 28 percent of the total funds, know that the tax will only last for 7 years, and counties will need to ask voters to re-approve it. Saying so, I am proposing that small organizations are brought to the table for 7 years of planning with the agencies that will manage the funds, with elected officials, and with voters, all of whom are aiming for a fair “slice of the cake” as an implementation of the measure.

 

Eduardo Mendonça is the Director of Creative Youth Development at Arts Corps. A native of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, Eduardo is a veteran master teaching artist that has been with Arts Corps since its inception. He is Artistic Director of the international performance ensemble, Show Brazil! and heads his own Kent-based company, Brazil Arts & Education DBA: Show Brazil Productions, which promotes Brazilian culture and provides Portuguese voice-over talent for voice overs and videos exported to Brazil. Eduardo is also Co-Founder and Co-Director for BrasilFest, the annual Brazilian festival part of the Festál sponsored by the City of Seattle. Eduardo feels fortunate to be part of Arts Corps’ past, present, and future and is confident and excited for what is in store.

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